Giuseppe Verdi

La traviata

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4 October - 10 December 2014
Tour 2014

A new production from the 2014 Festival

La traviata, the fallen woman. Does that phrase still have relevance today?

For Verdi it was a subject of intense personal significance. He and the singer Giuseppina Strepponi lived together for ten years before they married, enduring the objections of those who viewed her as a woman of no worth or moral standing.

Violetta, the fallen woman of the title, is a vividly real, flesh-and-blood creation. She suffers from the consumption which will inevitably kill her but which, in the view of the time, brought with it a feverish intensity and heightened erotic impulse. Life, for her, is to be grasped with both hands and lived to the full.

The character is based on Marie Duplessis, mistress of Alexandre Dumas fils, who fictionalised her in his novel La Dame aux camélias. When another writer, Marcel Proust, saw La traviata, he wrote: ‘It’s a work which goes straight to my heart. Verdi has given it the style it lacked … for a dramatic work to touch popular sentiment the addition of music is essential.’

That music was written by Verdi at the peak of his powers. It is lyrical, heartbreaking and unforgettable, appealing directly to the emotions and resulting in an opera that invents itself anew for every generation.

Sung in Italian with English supertitles.

The performance lasts approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes, including one interval of 20 minutes.

Dates & Times - La traviata

Glyndebourne

Date Start Time Interval Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges
Saturday 4 October 2014 4:00pm 5:15 - 5:35pm 6:30pm
Please telephone the Box Office on +44 (0)1273 813813 to check for returned tickets.
Tuesday 7 October 2014 7:00pm 8:15 - 8:35pm 9:30pm
Please telephone the Box Office on +44 (0)1273 813813 to check for returned tickets.
Saturday 11 October 2014 4:00pm 5:15 - 5:35pm 6:30pm £37.00 Book Now
Friday 17 October 2014 7:00pm 8:15 - 8:35pm 9:30pm £66.00 Book Now
Wednesday 22 October 2014 4:00pm 5:15 - 5:35pm 6:30pm £66.00 Book Now
Saturday 25 October 2014 4:00pm 5:15 - 5:35pm 6:30pm £71.00 Book Now

Woking, New Victoria Theatre

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 29 October 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £33.90 - £89.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now
Saturday 1 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £33.90 - £89.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now

Canterbury, The Marlowe Theatre

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 5 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £29.75 - £57.25 online Book Now
Saturday 8 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £33.25 - £60.75 online Book Now

Norwich, Theatre Royal

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 12 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £6.50 - £52 Book Now
Saturday 15 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £6.50 - £52 Book Now

Milton Keynes Theatre

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 19 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £28.90 - £79.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now
Saturday 22 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £28.90 - £79.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now

Plymouth, Theatre Royal

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 26 November 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £12.70 - £50.20 Book Now
Saturday 29 November 2014 7:15pm 9:15pm £12.70 - £50.20 Book Now

Dublin, Bord Gáis Energy Theatre

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Wednesday 3 December 2014 7:30pm 10:00pm €35 - €125 plus €1.50 s/c per ticket up to €12; 12.5% over €12 (max €5.95) Book Now
Friday 5 December 2014 7:30pm 10:00pm €35 - €125 plus €1.50 s/c per ticket up to €12; 12.5% over €12 (max €5.95) Book Now
Saturday 6 December 2014 7:30pm 10:00pm €35 - €125 plus €1.50 s/c per ticket up to €12; 12.5% over €12 (max €5.95) Book Now

Stoke-on-Trent, Regent Theatre

Date Start Time Finish Time Ticket Price Ranges  
Tuesday 9 December 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £20.90 - £48.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now
Wednesday 10 December 2014 7:15pm 9:45pm £20.90 - £48.90 online + £2.85 transaction fee Book Now

Act I

At a party she is hosting, the courtesan Violetta Valéry is introduced to young Alfredo Germont. Violetta suddenly feels ill but assures her guests that she is fine. Alfredo, left alone with Violetta, confesses that he has loved her from afar for a year. She initially dismisses him, but is touched by his sincerity. After Alfredo and the other party guests leave, Violetta reflects on her feelings for him and on what life would be like if she accepted his love. But she cuts short her fantasy and rededicates herself to the pursuit of pleasure. 

Act II, Scene 1

For three months, Violetta and Alfredo have been living together in the country. Alfredo learns that Violetta has been selling her possessions in order to pay their expenses, so he leaves for Paris to make other financial arrangements. Germont, Alfredo’s father, unexpectedly visits, demanding that Violetta leave Alfredo so that his sister’s impending marriage will not be threatened by scandal. Violetta first objects but finally, in spite of her love for Alfredo, promises to renounce him forever. She writes Alfredo a letter ending their relationship, but before she can depart, Alfredo returns and is confused by her agitated state. After Violetta leaves, he reads her letter. Germont returns and tries to comfort his son, but Alfredo decides to confront Violetta.

Act II, Scene 2

At a soiree given by Violetta’s friend Flora Bervoix, the guests are surprised by Alfredo’s arrival. Violetta soon appears with Baron Douphol, her new lover. Alfredo gambles with the gentlemen, pretending not to notice Violetta, who is alarmed by his belligerent behaviour. Fearing for his safety, Violetta begs Alfredo to leave, but he demands that she leave with him. When Violetta refuses, Alfredo summons the other guests and publicly humiliates Violetta. Germont arrives and denounces his son’s behaviour. The Baron challenges Alfredo to a duel.

Act III

Violetta is now gravely ill, and Dr Grenvil confides to Annina, her servant, that Violetta will not live much longer. Violetta rereads a letter from Germont informing her that Alfredo fled after wounding the Baron in the duel, but that he now knows of her sacrifice and is hurrying to her side. Alfredo arrives, begging Violetta’s forgiveness. The lovers dream of resuming their life together, but fate intervenes. 

Creative Team 

Conductor David Afkham / Jeremy Bines (5, 8 Nov; 9, 10 Dec)
Director Tom Cairns
Designer Hildegard Bechtler
Revival Choreographer Daisy May Kemp
Lighting Designer Peter Mumford

Cast includes

Violetta Valéry Irina Dubrovskaya /
Natasha Jouhl (29 Oct; 1 Nov; 5 Dec)
Alfredo Germont Zach Borichevsky /
Emanuele D’Aguanno (22, 29 Oct; 1 Nov; 5 Dec)
Giorgio Germont Roman Burdenko /
Evez Abdulla (29 Oct; all performances in Nov; 9, 10 Dec)
Marchese D’Obigny Benjamin Cahn  
Baron Douphol Eddie Wade
Flora Bervoix Lauren Easton

The Glyndebourne Tour Orchestra 
The Glyndebourne Chorus 

Venera Gimadieva as Violetta in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Michael Fabiano as Alfredo and Tassis Christoyannis as Giorgio in La traviata, Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta and cast in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta and cast in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta and Michael Fabiano as Alfredo in La traviata, Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Venera Gimadieva as Violetta and cast in La traviata, Glyndebourne Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith
Michael Fabiano as Alfredo in La traviata, Festival 2014, Photo: Richard Hubert Smith

Comments

I saw La Traviata on 20 August. Violetta and Alfredo were sung beautifully and the orchestral playing was excellent although David Afkham's tempi were much too slow at times such as the early part of the overture. I couldn't understand why the cast were in modern dress particularly as the plot turns on the credibility of the Victorian attitude displayed by Germont pere and the fact that tuberculosis is pretty well unknown in France today, and is treatable with antibiotics. Most disappointing were the dismal stage sets such as the country retreat that looked like scruffy student accommodation and the gaming tables shoved up against a wall. We all enjoyed the performace but long for unpretentious productions that are pleasing to the eye as well as the ear.

We can't give too much away until curtain up but this article might be of interest http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/glyndebourne/10969174/Tom-Cairn...

Hi,

Is this in a contemporary setting/dressing, or original?

Thanks.

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