Imago the Opera blog

About Imago

In March 2013 Glyndebourne is staging Imago, our next large-scale community opera. Following the success of Knight Crew in 2010, we commissioned Es Devlin (designer), Orlando Gough (composer), Stephen Plaice (librettist) and Susannah Waters (director) to devise and create Imago, a new opera for the digital age.

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Over the next few months members of our cast and chorus will write about their experiences in a blog and through the ChorusCam... 

19 March 2013 - Final blog from Karen McInally

Performance!

After a busy last week of dress rehearsals, working with the amazing orchestra and 'tweaking', we finally opened to an audience. We started with a matinee for local schools supplemented by paying public because the main performances were pretty much sold out (not something we hear much of in local opera circles...).

The children sat in rapt concentration throughout and erupted spontaneously following the 'acapella wedding' (pictured above). That was a really special moment - put down to childish enthusiasm - so it was thrilling when exactly the same thing happened with the adult audiences on the following evenings. Apart from 'va pensiero' I have never heard of a chorus number getting such a cheer in the middle of an opera. It really is a great piece of music and 'deserves a life of its own' as one critic put it. The opera as a whole was very well received and I have never experienced curtain calls such as these. We were all elated and very proud to be part of the production and will take away many happy memories.

Imago - the transitional phase between caterpillar and butterfly - is a great title for the opera. At face value it is the name of  the computer system designed to interface the transition between old age and death, but it reflects transition in so many other ways; the transition between childhood and adulthood for many of the young performers; some of the adult chorus have been offered 'super' roles in the coming Glyndebourne season, thus transitioning from amateur to professional opera; and, for the older chorus members, it presages the transition from strong adult identity to that of a grey, unproductive, and forgotten existence as an elder in an institution. (I have never been so thankful that I live in a part of the country where one isn't seen by a geriatrician until the age of 76, giving me another 25 years of productive adult life to look forward to!)

However, the most important transition, and the main purpose of any community opera, is to find music lovers and turn them into opera lovers. A young singer in Opera South East summed it all up at our Pearl Fishers rehearsal yesterday saying, "All the people at school thought I was mad doing opera - now that they've seen Imago they think opera is really great".  JOB DONE - BRAVI TUTTI!

 

22 February 2013 - Update from Karen McInally

The fun bit and the really hard work is underway - putting the words and music together with choreography and furniture without falling over (or off) the set! Susannah (pictured right directing the chorus) has some lovely ideas but has to work organically, making adaptations and coming up with working alternatives very quickly. I nearly got to do my best Cleopatra impression - but the palanquin was only built for a sylph-like young Elizabeth Taylor - not her aged doppleganger!

This week we got to meet all of the principals and start running the opera. Whilst the chorus are involved in a lot of the scenes, there are more intimate scenes with the principals in order to tell the story. The snippets we've seen so far are stunning - the family scenes are quite funny and Elizabeth and Lisette’s duet had me in tears.

Hopefully a whole week of day long rehearsals has transformed us into a tightly-knit operatic machine ready to be fine-tuned to performance perfection. The long list of rehearsal dates has become scarily truncated - but we are determined to translate Orlando, Stephen and Susannah's vision into a spectacular World Premiere. We are so privileged to be able to participate in this intergenerational adventure and we don't intend to let anyone down.

 

20 February 2013 - Two minutes with...Orlando Gough, Composer

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I’ve composed the music.

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is a very contemporary and explores come of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

Imago is a narrative opera written for an opera house, with an orchestral score; so in some ways it is playing a game with rules invented in the 17th century. But the inclusion of technology definitely changes the nature of the game. The fact that a large part of the piece takes place in the digital world – in a kind of Second Life – means that it looks and sounds very different from a 19th century opera. It’s very vivid, unpredictable, slippery. People can appear and disappear instantaneously, can die and come back to life, and their voices can change and disintegrate and revive. Though it’s still, like many operas, a piece about longing and lost love.

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

Possibly a cross between Michael Holding the great West Indian fast bowler and David Byrne of Talking Heads. So I wouldn’t be very like myself at all!

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

As a teenager my (unfulfilled) ambition was to be a great cricketer. Though now, curiously, my sad-middle-aged-man’s regret is not having been in a rock group.

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life which you would most like to relive?

Tricky question. The obvious answer is early twenties, but actually my early twenties were pretty chaotic. In fact each age was a mixture of good and bad. I’m very happy being the age I am.

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

Well, I spend most of my time working on community projects..... The difference between a wholly professional project and a community project is that a community project is more interesting, more frustrating, more engaging, more difficult to pull off, more exciting when it succeeds, more disappointing when it fails........

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

Because, if we get it right, it will be thought-provoking, exhilarating, moving, funny with some extremely hummable tunes.

Read a Financial Times interview with Orlando in which he talks in more detail about the process of composing Imago here.

 

18 February 2013 - Update from Karen McInally

Well it's been a month of firsts....

  • First costume fitting - let's just say wardrobe is not going for the glamorous granny look
  • First interview on digital radio for The Wireless, Age UK's radio for grown-ups and best of all...
  • First rehearsal on the main stage at Glyndebourne!

Karen McInally rehearsing for Imago on the main stage at GlyndebourneI don't know how to describe the sound of eyes widening and jaws dropping but you can hear it on Hazel's latest ChorusCam video blog. The stage is enormous, easily the biggest I have ever seen, with huge wings, stratospheric flies and even room for bits of set for the next Glyndebourne Festival productions.

The view out front was totally awe-inspiring. The gorgeous honeyed tones of the woodwork and warm yellow lights made it look almost golden - like some gilded eastern temple or perhaps the 'amber room' in St Petersburg. The auditorium seemed huge and we all tried to imagine it full of people and hubbub.

Then we turned around to view the set.... three floors of grey utilitarian nursing home cut directly from some 1970's new town and placed onto a stage. (It will definitely help me get into character - I felt old and grey just imagining living there!) We were then taken through the health and safety rules by the commanding stage manager* and told to familiarise ourselves with the different levels. It was like being on some grand ocean liner and there was even a small 'swell' on the top floor. Can't wait to see what it looks like with all the lights and projections (not to mention the Pepper's ghosts...)

It is a real luxury having the remaining rehearsals directly on the main stage -but I think it is quite necessary to reduce the stage-'shock' for the predominantly amateur and stage-naive chorus. After a few evenings on the set (Karen pictured on stage above) it seems very natural and the auditorium is shrinking steadily. The stage now feels about the same width as my local theatre - although the acoustics are somewhat better!

So I have now sung my first lines on the Glyndebourne stage - my next first will be doing it in front of a paying audience...GULP!!!!

* the stage manager is really lovely, as are all the Glyndebourne people we have met so far, but he has a fabulous bark (he is yet to bite - but if the youngsters don't stop playing with their phones...watch this space!)

13 February 2013 - Chorus Cam Three - Taking to the stage!

The Imago chorus step on the Glyndebourne stage for the very first time and Hazel has a costume fitting!

 

6 February 2013 - Two minutes with....Chris Tudor, Movement Director

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I am the movement director.  I am working alongside the director, creating and structuring the movement for the chorus within the various Imago cyber-worlds.  I have been involved with the auditions for the chorus, which has been a great way for the auditionees to get a feel for the process involved in staging an opera, and also for us to try out some of our ideas to see what might work…or not!

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is a very contemporary and explores come of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

The music is accessible and impactful, rhythmic with passages of beautiful melody.  It has a great story line, unfolding with some quite unexpected outcomes.  It is set at the point of interaction between the virtual world and patients in a rest home, the patients creating their Imago avatars, who slowly begin to take on human emotions and needs.  It has moments of humour and lightness as well as more emotional scenes and will appeal to a wide audience.

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

Not much!  Maybe a tweak here and there, I’d be more interested to alter the focus of society, away from the selfish accumulation of money and things, to more understanding and respect for each other and our environment.  So I think I’d have to create a new world within Imago!

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

I have always been involved in dance and theatre.

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life, which you would most like to relive?

I feel very blessed, I had a wonderful dance career, and continue to work within my art form, creating, teaching and generally exploring.  It still excites me, so I guess I’m open to the idea that my ‘Golden Age’ is ongoing.

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

There is quite a range of abilities within the chorus for Imago which means that I have to tailor the movement material to reflect this, not too complex but still challenging.  There is an enormous enthusiasm among the chorus and a willingness to try things out.  I hope that they will maintain their extraordinary focus and energy through the performances.

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

Imago is going to be a wonderful experience, accessible to a wide range of people from music and opera lovers, to an audience interested to see how cyber-world ideas can be translated to the stage. 

 

30 January 2013 -Two minutes with....Fiona Dunn, Assistant Director

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I am the Assistant Director. This is rarely a clearly defined role and depends on the director and the piece itself. Basically you do what is says on the tin, you - 'assist the director.'

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is a very contemporary and explores come of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

If you like jazz, opera, musical theatre or pop music. If you like your ear to be challenged and enjoy beautiful melodies. If you want to be surprised and maybe find yourself having a bit of a weep. If you own an ipod, smart phone, go on Facebook...if u know how 2 lol....or if you just want to soak up something magical, visually stunning and musically exquisite,  then that's what this is. Come and see it and choose your own experience!

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

I would be a brilliant pianist, sing like Joni Mitchell and have blonde hair...!

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

I always wanted to be on stage. At fifteen I was starting at The National Youth Theatre. It was my first time living in London, working with professionals and  making fantastic theatre. It only served to fuel my passion to be in the theatre.

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life which you would most like to relive?

I had a sweet sixteen summer, first love, sang in a band, stayed out late, discovered parties and I remember it seemed hot and sunny all summer.

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

The community chorus. It's not their job, but their commitment is absolute and essential to the piece, and you want to push them to their full potential. It's thrilling to see them grow more confident, work together and enjoy being part of something so fantastic.

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

 I don't think you will believe what you see...literally...

 

8 January 2013 - Chorus Cam Two - Meet the Chorus!

A few weeks in to the rehearsal process, Chorus Member and Video Diarist, Hazel Gaydon, is back to introduce us to some of the rest of the Imago Chorus.

 

19 December 2012 - Two minutes with...Lee Reynolds, Chorus Master

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I'm the Chorus Master, which means it's my responsibility to teach the music to all of the community cast. I have to get everyone singing in a way that is accurate, balanced, blended, clear, exciting, flexible and in the right style.

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is a very contemporary and explores come of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

Musically, it draws on pop styles and jazz riffs, and is very difficult to read on paper... But when you hear a phrase a few times, suddenly the mists part and it seems obvious that that's how the rhythm should go! The challenge is then to perform it really accurately, but in a way that doesn't sound too effortful or heavy-handed; that's a challenge you face in traditional operatic repertoire, of course, but Imago takes that challenge many steps further.

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

I'm pretty sure I'd use my Imago avatar cathartically for all the things I'm not allowed to do in real life... I won't go into any more detail than that! As for what I'd change, I'd definitely be slightly shorter with not-quite-as-telescopic limbs. I'm aware that when I conduct, I often look like an insect trying to take flight.

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

As a teenager the ambition was always to be a conductor. In younger years, I had wanted to be a barrister, because I found I was quite good at arguing. When I was very young, I'm told I wanted to be an ambulance. Not a medic - an actual ambulance.

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life which you would most like to relive?

 The last twelve months have been pretty fantastic for me. If I could have a few more like them that would be great.

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

Working on community projects is a huge challenge because you are working with a group including a massive range of previous experience. Some of the cast have never read a musical score in their lives, some teach music as their profession and are extremely experienced performers. Working in a way that doesn't patronise some people but also that doesn't go straight over the heads of others is a challenge unique to community projects, and one for which I am always trying to improve my solutions.

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

Because it is just insanely cool. If you think opera is uncool, I want to sit next to you and film your expressions as you watch Imago. Then play the film back to you afterwards. Any takers?

 

14 December 2012 - Update from Chorus member Karen McInally

We did it! Managed the acapella wedding number off-book only five weeks into rehearsals and it didn't sound too shabby. Orlando Gough, the composer, was there and was delighted with all but the first 12 bars. They are fiendishly difficult but we'll have those licked by the time we've added movement and staging.....I think all the chorus pieces have been looked at now. Just have to learn things ready for production rehearsals which start in January. I'm looking forward to working with Susannah and seeing how we all fit into the story.

It's been a busy few weeks learning music and being interviewed for various films and videoblogs about the experience, filling in questionnaires and diaries etc. Never imagined there would be all these different aspects, but I suppose it is very apposite in an opera about electronic communication and multiple media. One of the principals was thrilled to find out he is even going to be a hologram "just like Freddie Mercury at the Olympics"!

We are starting to really gel as a group as we find out a little more of each other's backgrounds. Yesterday I chatted with two West End performers - one who last performed in the 1960's and one who wasn't even born until the 1980's, someone who auditioned for Sadlers Wells Opera, someone in a Cadbury's advert on TV and someone who performed Gilbert & Sullivan in the Arabian Desert. Later, in the pub, I discovered others with some very unusual skills (possibly more on that later!)...what a talented bunch we are!

We have suggested wearing Christmas jumpers for our last music rehearsal next week. As a voice therapist I can tell you that laughter is a great way to keep the singing voice open!

Season's greetings and, should the world not end on 21 December, best wishes for a happy and heathy New Year. Sooo looking forward to 6 - 9 March.......

 

12 December 2012 - Two minutes with....Stephen Plaice, Librettist

Who better to tell us more about Imago than the man who wrote it! Below librettist, Stephen Plaice, takes us through the story of his new opera.

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I am the librettist. I write the story and the words.

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is a very contemporary and explores come of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

It imagines an on-line world where the elderly can relive their lives with an imago, a kind of avatar. Will they make the same choices and mistakes they did in their real lives?

But then a young person accesses the system and becomes romantically involved with the elderly person's imago. So we see both ends of adulthood, and their separate longings. Or are they really that separate?

It is also built in to the Imago system that, once launched, the imagos gradually become more and more independent of their hosts - so the drama is four-cornered - an elderly host, a young host and two imagos gradually pulling away from their on-line 'parents'.

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

In one on-line game, during the research, I chose an avatar called Molly Recreant, a young woman making her way in the world, open to all experience, without any pre-conceptions of what her future would be like. She was very much the prototype of Lisette, once she has distanced herself from her elderly host.

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

That was my dream, alongside being a writer! I have lived one half of my dream anyway - and I do, at least, work in music theatre! I wrote a play recently about my imaginary friendship with Mick Jagger, aged eighteen. But the irony of the piece was that Mick longed to get away from his fans so he could follow the studious, book-devouring youth that I was enjoying!

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life which you would most like to relive?

Now I have my family, I wouldn't want to go back, but Marcia and I do sometimes long for Innsbruck and the mountains of the Tirol where we lived for the first two years we were together. Highly romantic!

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

I have worked on a number of large-scale community and youth operas. This one is different because it truly covers the whole age-spectrum of the community. That was part of the idea - to hear all those voices on one stage. At the first chorus rehearsal, it was great to see this has been genuinely realized in the casting.

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

Because it is genuinely unlike any opera or theatre they will have seen before. I also hope it makes people think about both the possibilities and the pitfalls of living out a life in cyberspace, rather than in reality. It's intended as both a celebration and a divination of what is to come.

 

5 December 2012 - Two minutes with....Susannah Waters, Director

Each week we'll be spending two minutes with a member of the creative or production team behind Imago to find out more about them and their part in the project. Today it's the turn of Imago Director, Susannah Waters.

1. Can you tell us about your role on Imago?

I am the director, so ultimately responsible for everything you see on stage.

2. Lots of people see opera as a traditional art form but Imago is very contemporary and explores some of the issues which surround the technology which is now at our fingertips - how would you describe the piece to someone wanting to know more?

For me, traditional is an odd word – what’s traditional? I have always been interested in opera for the way it speaks about human emotions, and because of the musical element the way it can take us, at its best, to the in-between experiences in our lives beyond words, greater than just words. Imago is a new opera, set in a modern world – as was The Marriage of Figaro when it premiered, a modern opera set in its own time – and I hope it will contain all the same kind of recognisable human emotions.

3. What would your Imago avatar be like and what might you choose to change about yourself in an online second life?

Gosh. My Imago avatar would be about 32, full of dreams and possibilities but with a little more self-knowledge? I’d quite like to look different – just for a change – Juliette Binoche would be all right, or someone tall!

4. In Imago fifteen-year-old Gulliver dreams of being a rock star – what was your ambition as a teenager?

I pretty much wanted to do what I have ended up doing – sing, act, direct, and write – though I’ve always been the sort of person who reads the jobs listings and is fascinated by all sorts of things, so I think I went through phases of wanting to be a lawyer, a child psychologist, a funeral director, a dancer, and so on and so on.

5. What would be your ‘golden age’ – an age or time in your life which you would most like to relive?

I don’t believe in re-living. There are things I wished I started doing earlier, like directing – but then the things I was doing instead, I wouldn’t want to have missed those, either.

6. How does a community project like Imago differ from other projects you might work on?

For me, there’s very little difference. I have the same ambitions, the same huge desire to create something moving and clear for the audience. It takes a little longer with people who are untrained, but the end result can be just as focused and thrilling.

7. Why should people come and see Imago at Glyndebourne in March?

Because it’s a new opera! Always great to be the first people in the world to see something. And because the people on stage will be absolutely giving their all and tremendously excited, as well as proud, to be a part of the show. That kind of generosity on stage never fails to translate into a wonderful experience for the audience.

 

26 November 2012 - ChorusCam No 1 - Rehearsals

Glyndebourne’s new 2013 community opera Imago is now in rehearsals. Chorus Member and Video Diarist, Hazel Gaydon, has given us her first video diary charting her progress from auditions to the main stage. Over the coming weeks and months, Hazel will continue to offer a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of Imago and introduce us to the cast and crew who are bringing it to life.

About Hazel...

After a teaching career and raising four children, I have been working with a national charity to inspire community-building. To help fund this, I opened up my home to musicians and visitors alike as a place to stay. As chairman of New Sussex Singers, I sing with the Kantanti Ensemble and Collegiate Singers, and train with James Anderson, the international tenor.
 
Joining the Imago chorus has combined two of my favourite things, and with my last local appearance as Cinderella being years ago it’s a chance to try singing whilst acting again. My newest grandchild is due on the day Imago closes, so the race is on to complete our performances before her daughter starts a production of her own!

ChorusCam: No 1 Rehearsals from Glyndebourne on Vimeo

 

16 November 2012 - Karen McInally

Audition now complete, music rehearsals for the Imago cast are now underway. Below chorus member, Karen McInally, gives us a peek into her diary to find out what the experience has been like so far.

Karen was introduced to opera soon after starting singing lessons 12 years ago, and now regularly performs with Opera South East and other local Societies in principal and chorus roles. Karen has a Diploma in Opera Performance Studies from Birkbeck College, London (2007) and continues her voice studies with Jane Metcalfe. She (finally!) won the Gold Medal for Singing at Hastings Musical Festival in 2011 and sings with popular classical trio Le Tuttecurve when not working full-time as a Macmillan Speech and Language Therapist and voice therapist in East Sussex. She is thrilled to get the opportunity to experience the acoustics and perform in such a prestigious venue as Glyndebourne.

1 -  The Audition

Never been to Birley Centre - it's a lovely building, if a bit of a rabbit warren. Twenty odd people of all ages 15-70+ including a couple of familiar faces from summer schools. Think I'm the most easterly. Introductions and ice-breakers are followed by learning the audition piece, then adding some stylised movement and adding an 'emotional wash'. Things ok until asked to do the movement at two and four-times the speed - style has morphed into something like my dad at a wedding; I'm sure that's not what they are looking for.... We sounded great singing all together but it's dreadful what nerves can do. Think the dreaded singing in pairs is going well until I realise I am singing the wrong harmony line. Never mind - maybe they will need some female baritones - hopefully I'll get some brownie points for not hiding behind the score. Now just have to wait until the end of October to see if I made the grade.

2 - The Call

Hurrah I'm in! First stop is costume fitting to be measured and photographed. This makes a change from the usual "try this on" the week before a show. There are an awful lot of rehearsals booked (I'm used to 6 production rehearsals with my local opera group) but Glyndebourne is famed for its preparation and standard of performance so it's really great we are being afforded the same privilege.

3 - First rehearsal

Will I know anybody? As I'm one of the first to arrive I sit down and chat to a lovely man who turns out to be Stephen the librettist. Susanna the director congratulates us all - especially the 'ladies of a certain age' who had the biggest competition for places. Almost makes up for the fact I have a part in the Elder chorus - the 16 residents of the nursing home...The room fills up and there is an air of expectancy as we open the (thick) scores. We start with the hardest number first. Lee encourages us by saying it's one of the most difficult pieces he's ever seen but he thinks we'll be up for the challenge. I'm not sure he's still thinking this an hour later when we've only covered the first 20 bars. It's a great piece though and we will feel we've really achieved something when we've learned it. After a quick break and "I'm sure I've seen you somewhere befores" we start on the final chorus - a beautiful atmospheric piece. Laughing off my tears I head on the long drive home...will all the travelling be worth it? You bet!

4  - Second rehearsal  

Turns out there are several benefits of being part of the 'Elder' chorus; didn't get called until 2nd half of rehearsal and therefore had first dibs on the interval biscuits, but, best of all, only involved in four of the scenes, so don't have to learn as many songs as the 'adult' chorus - some of whom who are much older than me! Downside is it looks like I won't be doing much movement - so won't get to lose weight as I'd hoped (certainly not with those biscuits!)

Tonight we met Orlando, the composer, and he didn't run away screaming when we massacred the difficult acapella number. Lee was struggling to rein in the men who were providing the rhythm.  I think the women take the rhythm in the next section - so we'll see if we can keep it steadier. To paraphrase Dorothy Parker "What is it with men and premature acceleration?"

 

8 October 2012

Suzannah has been bowled over with the enthusiam of local people wanting to take part so far. Find out how auditions are going so far and get to meet some of the people involved in this peek behind the scenes at the Imago auditions:

Comments

Really enjoyed last night, thank you Lee.
Just a suggestion from a lowly chorus member - a tee - shirt with the lovely Imago butterfly on it would be a great memento. Are there any plans for this?
Michaele

Just to say, Karen - I can now see in the well-lie rehearsal rooms how very young you are and that your hair is CLEARLY blond and not grey (like mine, getting greyer every minute!).
But I'm glad you're happy to be in the Elders Chorus - I think you get some of the best bits and don't think you won't be moving a little in the Hip Wedding!

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